Estate Planning & Probate

Probate Lawyers

At Lodestone Legal Group, our Estate Planning & Probate Lawyers provide our clients with peace of mind that their loved ones will be taken care of in the event of their death or incapacity. We understand that this can be a difficult topic to discuss, but having a plan in place can help relieve anxiety and uncertainty about what may happen in the future if a loved one becomes incapacitated or passes away.

To hear from our Estate Planning and Probate Attorney, click the image to the left.

Avoid Probate

Avoiding Probate? Our Probate Lawyers are here to guide our clients through the estate planning process in a painless and efficient manner. As a result, our clients leave our law office with executed documents and a confidence that they have a plan in place to take care of themselves and their loved ones in the future. Additionally, in the event of a loved one’s death, we provide guidance and direction through the probate process in order to ensure that assets are properly distributed to beneficiaries and heirs.

What Our Probate Lawyers Offer

Most people want to know that when they die, their assets are distributed according to their wishes and their family will be taken care of. We guide our clients through the process of creating a last will and testament by discussing their objectives, goals, and concerns; their financial and family situation; potential estate tax implications; and other worries in order to create a last will and testament that meets their goals.

For some clients, there are concerns beyond the distribution of their assets in the event of their death such as planning for potential estate taxes, avoiding probate, or taking care of a loved one with special needs. At Lodestone Legal Group, we can provide direction and guidance regarding different types of trusts and help clients determine if a trust is an appropriate tool to address their concerns.

A Financial Power of Attorney gives a person the power to make financial decisions on behalf of the client in the event that the client becomes incapacitated. We educate our clients regarding financial powers of attorney and help guide them through the process of designating the decision makers, along with potential backups, to act in their place if a future incapacity arises. These powers of attorney ensure that the decision makers chosen by the client have the authority to make financial decisions on the client’s behalf which may prevent delay or the need for a conservatorship in the future.

Many clients are concerned with who will be able to make health care decisions for them in the event of their disability or incapacity. An Advance Care Directive combines the traditional Health Care Power of Attorney and Living Will into one document that allows clients to choose someone to make health care decisions on their behalf and to advocate their wishes regarding end of life care.

Probate is the legal process of administering a decedent’s estate and ensuring that creditors are paid and that assets are distributed to the decedent’s heirs. At Lodestone Legal Group, our Probate Attorneys guide our clients through the probate process which may include filing the Petition for Probate, notifying creditors, beneficiaries, and TennCare; obtaining an estate tax ID number, assisting with the preparation of inheritance tax returns, identifying and collecting assets, and distributing estate assets to heirs.

Disclaimer

The information and materials available at this web site are for informational purposes only and not intended for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact an attorney for advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Accessing this website, the material posted on this website, the email links contained within this site do not create an attorney-client relationship between Lodestone Legal Group and the user. The opinions expressed on this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not represent the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney.

Resources to Estate Planning & Probate Law

3 Reasons People Under 35 Should Have an Estate Plan

Most young people dismiss discussions of Estate Planning because they think it’s too costly or they are too young to need an Estate Plan; however, Estate Planning is just as important at age 30 as it is at age 75.

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When Should You Update Your Estate Plan?

Creating an Estate Plan should not be something you do once and then place the documents in a drawer to never look at again. An Estate Plan is something that should change and evolve as your life changes and evolves.

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Executing Your Will During the COVID-19 Pandemic

On April 9, 2020, Governor Bill Lee issued Executive Order No. 26 regarding remote witnessing and notarization of estate planning documents. The Executive Order sets out requirements for proper remote witnessing and notarization of legal documents.

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