Blog

Apr

28

Software No Man’s Land

Over the last decade there has been a steady erosion of I.P. protection – particularly patent protection – for software even as there has during that same time been an explosion of software innovation.  So, what to make of this? Under the patent statute, patents can be awarded on processes, machines, articles of manufacture, and […]

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Apr

21

Domestic Assault, Who Can Be Charged and What Does It Mean For You?

In Tennessee, domestic violence is separate from regular assault charges based on the relationship between the parties involved. If the assault occurs between an adult or a minor in any of the following relationships, the state considers the crime domestic: Current or former spouses Persons who are dating or have dated, or have or had […]

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Mar

24

Estate Planning Myths and Misconceptions

Myth: I don’t have anything to leave to anyone, so I don’t need estate planning. Truth: Estate planning is more than just disposing of your “stuff.” An important aspect of estate planning that is often overlooked is incapacity planning. A last will and testament (“will”) only becomes effective upon your passing through the probate process.  Your […]

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Mar

17

Repercussions of a DUI

The next time you think about getting behind the wheel with a slight buzz, you may want to consider if the chances of being charged with a DUI are really worth it. In Tennessee, DUI charges are tiered, meaning that the more DUI’s you receive, the more expensive and inconvenient they become. Tennessee has began to […]

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Mar

11

Debt to Income Ratio in Bankruptcy by Rachel Lamey

A common misconception people have about filing bankruptcy is that the amount of debt a person has, or their debt-to-income ratio, is what qualifies them to file a petition. While the amount of debt is relevant to a petition, a person’s income is the number one factor in determining eligibility. Let’s talk about how this […]

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Mar

1

Can Employers Require COVID-19 Vaccinations? by Gaylord Gardner

With the roll out of the COVID-19 vaccinations speeding up, some employers are asking whether they can legally require employees to get a COVID-19 vaccination.  In many cases, the answer is “yes” so long as employers comply with federal and state workplace laws.  Recently the EEOC provided an opinion that under the Americans with Disabilities […]

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Feb

12

My Business was Just Served with a Lawsuit. What should I do next? by J. Drew Zimmer

The most important thing that any business can do when it is served as a defendant in a lawsuit is to immediately contact an attorney for a consultation. It does not matter if you ‘know for a fact’ that it is a nuisance suit or just factually incorrect. Never reach out to the Plaintiff or […]

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Jan

28

Trust Us, You Can Avoid Probate by Brittney R. Mulvaney

Having an estate plan is essential to prepare for the future and provide for your loved ones. A major question that most clients have regarding their estate plan is whether they should choose a last will and testament (a “will”) or a revocable living trust to express their testamentary intent. This blog post discusses a […]

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Jan

7

You’ve Been Arrested, Now What? by Haley Smith

While no one would ever choose to be arrested, it is smart to be prepared in the event you find yourself in such a situation. Once an officer informs you that you are under arrest, remain silent and inform the officer that you will not answer any questions until you have spoken to your attorney. […]

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Dec

22

What’s in a Name? Why Federal Trademark Registration Matters by Jeromye V. Sartain

Every business has a brand.  And every brand implicates trademark law.  Being sure that your rights in your brand name are secured through trademark registration is vitally important to your business. While federal registration technically does not give rise to trademark rights, it can definitely help in protecting and enforcing those rights, which are ultimately […]

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Dec

16

Estate Planning Myths and Misconceptions by Brittney R. Mulvaney

Myth #1: I have a will so probate won’t be necessary. This is a very common misconception. Probate is the court supervised process for distributing a person’s property and paying final bills after that person passes away. A last will and testament is not a document that can be executed to avoid probate. Wills can […]

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Nov

24

The Student Borrower Bankruptcy Relief Act of 2019 by Rachel Lamey

On May 9th, 2019, New York Representative Jerrold Nadler introduced the Student Borrower Bankruptcy Relief Act of 2019, also referenced as H.R. 2648, to the House of Representatives. It is commonly accepted that student loan debt is nondischargeable in a bankruptcy filing. This means that student loan debt survives a bankruptcy discharge and is still […]

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